Peremennye Zvezdy

"Peremennye Zvezdy",
Prilozhenie
,
vol. 11, N 23 (2011)

New Elements of 42 Southern Variables

A. V. Khruslov
Tula, Russia

Received:   30.03.2011;   accepted:   3.06.2011
(E-mail for contact: khruslov@bk.ru)


#NameOtherCoord (J2000)TypeMaxMinSystemPeriodEpoch (JD)typeSpCommentL.CurveFind.ChartData
1 TYC 6433 1366 102 18 59.63, -23 05 32.0EW12.512.85V0.4677002453600.271min Comm. 11.png ASAS 021900-2305.5
2 GSC 7046-0163404 53 19.30, -31 31 56.7RRAB12.813.6V0.5489462453600.298max Comm. 22.png ASAS 045319-3131.8
3 GSC 7068-0030705 38 30.43, -35 54 20.0RRAB12.914.0V0.5907612453600.174max Comm. 33.png ASAS 053830-3554.4
4DQ LupGSC 7818-0003314 35 21.47, -43 09 52.1RRC13.4514.0V0.23985882453600.216max Comm. 44.png ASAS 143521-4310.0
5UZ LupGSC 8292-0173314 54 24.87, -52 10 30.1RRAB13.314.3V0.4757272453600.363max Comm. 55.png ASAS 145425-5210.4
6 GSC 6170-0044515 14 41.71, -15 59 07.7HADS12.412.8V0.08399382453600.002max Comm. 66.png ASAS 151442-1559.1 NSVS 16202290
7DO LibGSC 6186-0078615 49 11.63, -16 43 33.3RRAB13.815.0V0.5406202453600.391max Comm. 77.png ASAS 154912-1643.6 NSVS 16301968
8DR LibGSC 6191-0022815 53 02.82, -18 33 57.4RRAB14.015.1V0.4694162453600.276max Comm. 88.png ASAS 155303-1834.0
9EO LibGSC 6191-0112415 55 56.08, -17 34 57.0RRAB12.6:13.4:V0.608462453600.514max Comm. 99.png ASAS 155556-1735.1 NSVS 16308559
10BO ScoUSNO-A2.0 0600-2052912416 27 25.36, -26 06 53.8SRA13.014.8V1402452725max Comm. 1010.png ASAS 162725-2607.0
11AW ScoUSNO-A2.0 0600-2101038716 37 48.34, -29 18 55.4RRAB13.214.3V0.5969492453600.210max Comm. 1111.png ASAS 163749-2918.9
12FL ScoGSC 7360-0145517 01 47.69, -31 30 33.8EW13.113.55V0.4132762453600.134min Comm. 1212.png ASAS 170148-3130.6
13KN ScoUSNO-A2.0 0525-2638079417 05 38.22, -30 16 06.6EW13.814.2V0.4678982453600.310min Comm. 1313.png ASAS 170538-3016.1
14V610 ScoGSC 7873-0024417 06 47.75, -39 52 35.3EB12.8513.3V3.51922453601.11min Comm. 1414.png ASAS 170648-3952.6
15V428 ScoGSC 7390-0172817 56 29.86, -37 08 09.7SRD12.0513.55V672453663maxK0-K2Comm. 1515.png ASAS 175630-3708.2
16CP PavGSC 8751-0237418 09 51.39, -57 00 53.0RRAB13.814.8V0.539192453600.133max Comm. 1616.png ASAS 180951-5700.8
17V3801 SgrGSC 6273-0021718 19 42.70, -18 54 37.5EW13.4514.0V0.4319952453600.157min Comm. 1717.png ASAS 181943-1854.6
18V3810 SgrUSNO-A2.0 0675-2538256018 23 21.30, -22 22 17.9EW13.113.5V0.4806902453400.321min Comm. 1818.png ASAS 182322-2222.4
19V3820 SgrGSC 6857-0035518 26 22.33, -24 14 16.5CEP13.114.3V13.1272453601.6max Comm. 1919.png ASAS 182623-2414.3
20V3335 SgrGSC 7405-0062418 26 45.49, -36 47 37.5RVA12.413.6V59.262453638min Comm. 2020.png ASAS 182646-3647.6
21V3824 SgrUSNO-A2.0 0600-3357946118 26 56.18, -24 18 17.2RRAB13.214.1:V0.612092453600.210max Comm. 2121.png ASAS 182656-2418.3
22V1610 SgrUSNO-A2.0 0600-3364930018 27 18.28, -27 09 40.6SR13.014.2V1632454308max Comm. 2222.png ASAS 182718-2709.7
23V3833 SgrUSNO-A2.0 0600-3400474618 29 06.07, -26 37 55.1SR12.714.4V1542453832max Comm. 2323.png ASAS 182906-2637.9
24V1899 SgrGSC 6865-0311318 31 45.35, -26 45 53.3RVA11.214.1V105.22453586min Comm. 2424.png ASAS 183145-2645.9
25V2363 SgrGSC 6857-0285518 32 35.30, -23 14 04.4SR13.013.9V1472452843max Comm. 2525.png ASAS 183236-2314.1
26V3597 SgrUSNO-B1.0 0579-094157118 34 53.35, -32 00 44.9M:13.2>14.8V1272453173max Comm. 2626.png ASAS 183453-3200.8
27CX PavGSC 8753-0113018 35 34.03, -57 29 13.8RRAB13.714.5V0.5996272453600.475max Comm. 2727.png ASAS 183533-5729.2
28V3687 SgrGSC 7419-0299318 38 20.60, -36 40 25.4SRA12.414.4V2052454313max Comm. 2828.png ASAS 183821-3640.4
29CZ PavGSC 8770-0126218 51 19.36, -58 50 44.6RRAB13.514.6V0.5498622453600.111max Comm. 2929.png ASAS 185119-5850.9
30OO PavGSC 9300-0059318 57 58.12, -71 50 56.9SRA12.714.7V1232452920max Comm. 3030.png ASAS 185757-7151.0
31V2153 SgrGSC 7936-0086219 38 21.00, -40 22 40.5EW13.214.0V0.3384312453600.167min Comm. 3131.png ASAS 193821-4022.7
32V2166 SgrGSC 7937-0324719 42 30.22, -40 11 48.1EA13.413.9V3.675522453600.16min Comm. 3232.png ASAS 194230-4011.8
33V2184 SgrGSC 7438-0017419 46 17.49, -37 24 52.7EA12.713.4V16.49602453614.205min Comm. 3333.png ASAS 194617-3724.8
34V2192 SgrGSC 7937-0057519 48 16.89, -40 18 51.8EW13.6514.2V0.3560612453600.093min Comm. 3434.png ASAS 194817-4018.9
35V2202 SgrGSC 7934-0187019 52 43.92, -38 57 52.2RRAB14.015.0V0.779082453600.415max Comm. 3535.png ASAS 195244-3857.9
36QY PavGSC 8787-0151319 53 42.39, -59 20 09.9EW14.014.7V0.2965872453600.159min Comm. 3636.png ASAS 195343-5920.2
37FY PavGSC 9310-0073619 57 15.57, -69 44 22.7EA13.5>14.4V6.874842453163.69min Comm. 3737.png ASAS 195717-6944.4
38V2223 SgrGSC 7947-0176220 01 30.96, -39 11 39.8RRAB14.015.1V0.627072453600.307max Comm. 3838.png ASAS 200131-3911.7
39V2227 SgrGSC 7951-0090720 03 24.62, -40 08 55.9RRAB13.815.0:V0.5819282453600.388max Comm. 3939.png ASAS 200325-4008.9
40V2240 SgrGSC 7960-0086620 10 52.05, -43 37 18.2RRAB13.514.2V0.5520242453600.505max Comm. 4040.png ASAS 201052-4337.3
41V2264 SgrGSC 7949-0107420 20 09.31, -38 44 20.2RRAB14.014.8:V0.539422453600.097max Comm. 4141.png ASAS 202009-3844.3
42V338 PavGSC 9105-0122021 08 34.15, -63 28 05.8RRAB13.114.2V0.530832453600.188max Comm. 4242.png ASAS 210834-6328.1

Comments:


1. The variability of TYC 6433 1366 1 was reported by Pojmanski (2002). The ASAS-3 catalog lists the variable as an EC/RRC star with the wrong period of 0.61105 d. I reinvestigated the star using the currently available ASAS-3 data and found it to be an EW eclipsing binary with a shorter period. MinII = 12.75.

2. The variability of GSC 7046-01634 was discovered by Pojmanski (2002). The ASAS-3 catalog lists the variable as a Cepheid (DCEP-FU) with the wrong period of 1.2215 d. I reinvestigated the star using the currently available ASAS-3 data and found it to be an RRAB variable star. The period suggested by Pojmanski (2002) is a one-day alias of the real one (see the Table). M–m = 0.22 P. J–H = 0.168 (2MASS). The period probably is somewhat variable.

3. The variability of GSC 7068-00307 was reported by Pojmanski (2002). The ASAS-3 catalog lists the variable as an RRC: star with the wrong period of 0.270632 d. I reinvestigated the star using the currently available ASAS-3 data and found it to be an RRAB variable star. The period suggested by Pojmanski (2002) is a one-day alias of the real one (see the Table). M–m = 0.20 P. J–H = 0.329 (2MASS). Blazhko effect with the period = 40.5 d.

4. The variability of DQ Lup was discovered by McLeod and Swope (1941). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star with the wrong period of 0.31582 d. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRC star. The period suggested by GCVS is a one-day alias of the real one (see the Table). M–m = 0.42 P. J–H = 0.153 (2MASS).

5. The variability of UZ Lup was discovered by Mohr (1929). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR: star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.20 P. J–H = 0.325 (2MASS).

6. The variability of GSC 6170-00445 was reported by Pojmanski (2002). The ASAS-3 catalog lists the variable as a DSCT star with the wrong period of 0.10098 d. I reinvestigated the star using the currently available ASAS-3 data and the ROTSE-I/NSVS data. The period suggested by Pojmanski (2002) is a one-day alias of the real one (see the Table). M–m = 0.39 P. J–H = 0.149 (2MASS).

7. The variability of DO Lib was discovered by Hanley (1942). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 and ROTSE-I/NSVS data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.24: P. J–H = 0.313 (2MASS).

8. The variability of DR Lib was discovered by Hanley (1942). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.22: P. J–H = 0.247 (2MASS).

9. The variability of EO Lib was reported by Hanley (1942). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 and ROTSE-I/NSVS data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.21 P. J–H = 0.281 (2MASS). The tabulated amplitude is too low: ASAS-3 measured the combined brightness of two stars, GSC 6191-01124 and GSC 6191-01108; the NSVS amplitude is still lower than the ASAS-3 one, three stars (with the addition of GSC 6191-01128) were measured there.

10. BO Sco, an IN: type star (Orion variable) in the GCVS, where the information was based on Satyvoldiev (1982), is actually a semiregular pulsating star (SRA type) according to ASAS-3 data. J–H = 1.025 (2MASS).

11. The variability of AW Sco was discovered by Leavitt (1904). No light elements have been published to the present. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.18 P. J–H = 0.188 (2MASS).

12. The variability of FL Sco was reported by Swope (1928a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR: star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an eclipsing variable star (EW type). MinII = 13.5.

13. The variability of KN Sco was discovered by Swope (1928b). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an eclipsing variable star (EW type). MinII = 14.1. The close faint companion USNO-A2.0 0525-26382756 probably makes the ASAS amplitude too low.

14. The variability of V610 Sco was reported by Swope (1943). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an eclipsing variable (E type) without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an EB star. MinII = 13.0.

15. V428 Sco, an I type star (poorly studied irregular variable) in the GCVS, where the information was based on Swope (1936), is actually a semiregular pulsating star according to ASAS-3 data. Its colour index J–H = 0.665 (2MASS) and spectral type K0–K2 (Cieslinski et al. 1998) suggest the SRD type. The variable has two close faint companions, 2MASS 17563007-3708053 and 2MASS 17562951-3708134.

16. The variability of CP Pav was discovered by Shapley et al. (1939). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.27 P. J–H = 0.306 (2MASS). The close faint companion 2MASS 18095102-5700544 possibly makes the ASAS amplitude somewhat too low.

17. The variability of V3801 Sgr was discovered by Hoffleit (1972). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an EW type star. MinII = 13.95.

18. The variability of V3810 Sgr was reported by Hoffleit (1972). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an EW: type star without light elements. I confirm the eclipsing nature of this variable and suggest EW type according to ASAS-3 data. MinII = 13.4. The close faint companion USNO-A2.0 0675-25382928 probably makes the ASAS amplitude too low.

19. The variability of V3820 Sgr was reported by Hoffleit (1972). The variable was classified in the GCVS as a Cepheid (CEP:) with the possible period P=14: d. I confirm the pulsating nature of this variable (CEP type) according to ASAS-3 data. M–m = 0.35 P. J–H = 0.486 (2MASS).

20. The variability of V3335 Sgr was discovered by Plaut (1971). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an SRB: star (or maybe a Cepheid or an RV Tau variable) without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is definitely an RVA star. J–H = 0.313 (2MASS). Probably a double star on the Palomar images.

21. The variability of V3824 Sgr was discovered by Hoffleit (1972). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR: type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. J–H = 0.148 (2MASS). Observations are also satisfied by a twice shorter period, 0.30604 d, so that the type becomes RRC.

22. V1610 Sgr, a CEP: star (possible period P < 0.5 d) in the GCVS, where the information was based on Ponsen (1955), is actually a semiregular pulsating star (SR) according to ASAS-3 data. J–H = 0.942 (2MASS). Probably it can be identified with IRAS 18242–2711.

23. V3833 Sgr, an LB: star (slow irregular variable, spectral type M0:) in the GCVS, where the information was based on Hoffleit (1972), is actually an SR star according to ASAS-3 data. J–H = 0.968 (2MASS).

24. The variability of V1899 Sgr was discovered by Hoffleit (1961). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RV star without light elements. The ASAS-3 catalog lists the star as a MISC variable with the period of 52.880001 d. I reinvestigated the star using the currently available ASAS-3 data and found it an RVA variable star with a twice longer period. J–H = 0.444 (2MASS). The shape of the light curve varies, so that the primary minimum becomes the secondary one and vice versa.

25. The variability of V2363 Sgr was discovered by Hoffleit (1965). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an LB: star (slow irregular variable), of the spectral type M7. According to ASAS-3 data, it is a semiregular pulsating star. J–H = 1.179 (2MASS). IRAS 18295–2316.

26. The variability of V3597 Sgr was reported by Plaut (1971). The variable was classified in the GCVS as a Mira star (M:) with the period of P = 193: days. According to ASAS-3 data, the period from the GCVS is wrong. J–H = 0.835 (2MASS). IRAS 18316–3203. There is a close faint companion, USNO-B2.0 0579-0941562.

27. The variability of CX Pav was discovered by Shapley et al. (1939). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.17 P. J–H = 0.156 (2MASS).

28. The variability of V3687 Sgr was reported by Plaut (1971). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an SR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is a semiregular pulsating star (SRA). J–H = 0.846 (2MASS). IRAS Z18349–3643.

29. The variability of CZ Pav was discovered by Shapley et al. (1939). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.18 P. J–H = 0.036 (2MASS). Because of the close companion 2MASS 18511965–5850581, the ASAS amplitude is probably too low.

30. The variability of OO Pav was reported by Gessner and Meinunger (1974). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an L-type star (slow irregular variable). The ASAS-3 catalog lists the star (ASAS J185758–7150.9) as a MISC variable with the wrong period of P = 62.761505 d. I reinvestigated the star using the currently available ASAS-3 data and found it a semiregular pulsating star (SRA) with a twice longer period. J–H = 0.723 (2MASS).

31. The variability of V2153 Sgr was reported by Hoffmeister (1963a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an EB type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an eclipsing variable star (EW type). MinII = 13.8.

32. V2166 Sgr, an IS: type star (variable star with rapid variations) in the GCVS, where the information was based on Hoffmeister (1963a), is actually an eclipsing variable star (EA type) according to ASAS-3 data. D = 0.15 P. MinII = 13.8. A twice shorter period is not excluded.

33. The variability of V2184 Sgr was discovered by Hoffmeister (1963a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an EA-type star without light elements. I confirm the eclipsing nature of this variable (EA type) according to ASAS-3 data. D = 0.024 P. This is an eccentric binary system, the phase of MinII being 0.768 P.

34. The variability of V2192 Sgr was discovered by Hoffmeister (1963a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an eclipsing variable star (EW type). MinII = 14.2.

35. The variability of V2202 Sgr was reported by Hoffmeister (1963a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. J–H = 0.230 (2MASS).

36. The variability of QY Pav was discovered by Gessner and Meinunger (1974). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an eclipsing variable star (E type). No period is tabulated there, the time of minimum is given as HJD 2436785.247. I confirm the eclipsing nature of this variable (EW type) according to ASAS-3 data. MinII = 14.5.

37. The variability of FY Pav was discovered by Gessner and Meinunger (1974). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an eclipsing variable star (EA:/SD:), with the times of minima MinI = JD2436808.433, MinII = JD2436784.37. I confirm the eclipsing nature of this variable (EA type) according to ASAS-3 data. MinII = 13.9. D = 0.052 P.

38. The variability of V2223 Sgr was reported by Hoffmeister (1963a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.30: P. J–H = 0.069 (2MASS).

39. The variability of V2227 Sgr was reported by Hoffmeister (1963a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB type star. M–m = 0.15: P. J–H = 0.191 (2MASS). There is a close faint companion, 2MASS 20032409–4009044.

40. The variability of V2240 Sgr was reported by Hoffmeister (1963a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB type star. J–H = 0.224 (2MASS). The ASAS measured combined brightness of two stars, V2240 Sgr = GSC 7960–00866 = 2MASS 20105204–4337181 and 2MASS 20105250–4337238, so the amplitude is too low.

41. The variability of V2264 Sgr was reported by Hoffmeister (1963a). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. J–H = 0.265 (2MASS).

42. The variability of V338 Pav was reported by Hoffmeister (1963b). The variable was classified in the GCVS as an RR: type star without light elements. According to ASAS-3 data, it is an RRAB star. M–m = 0.24 P. J–H = 0.278 (2MASS).

Remarks:
I present my investigation of 42 known variable stars based on ASAS-3 (Pojmanski 2002) and ROTSE-I (Wozniak et al. 2004) data. These observations were analyzed using the period-search software developed by Dr. V.P. Goranskij for Windows environment. For the studied stars, previously suggested light elements and/or variability types were found to be wrong. The coordinates were drawn from the GCVS, Tycho-2 or 2MASS catalogs.

References:
Cieslinski, D., Steiner, J.E., Jablonski, F.J., 1998, Astron. Astrophys. Suppl., 131, 119
Gessner, H., Meinunger, I., 1974, Veröff. Sternwarte Sonn., 6, 249
Hanley, C.M., 1942, Harvard Observ. Annals, 109, 15
Hoffleit, D., 1961, Astron. J., 66, 188
Hoffleit, D., 1965, Astron. J., 70, 307
Hoffleit, D., 1972, IBVS, No. 660
Hoffmeister, C., 1963a, Veröff. Sternwarte Sonn., 6, 1
Hoffmeister, C., 1963b, Astron. Nachr., 287, 59
Leavitt, H.S., 1904, Harvard Observ. Circ., 90, 1
McLeod, N.W., Swope, H.H., 1941, Harvard Observ. Bull., 915, 29
Mohr, J., 1929, Harvard Observ. Bull., 866, 18
Plaut, L., 1971, Astron. Astrophys. Suppl., 4, 75
Pojmanski, G., 2002, Acta Astron., 52, 397
Ponsen, J., 1955, Leiden Annals., 20, 383
Satyvoldiev, V., 1982, Perem. Zvezdy Prilozh., 4, 127
Shapley, H., Boyce, E.H., Boyd, C.D., 1939, Harvard Observ. Annals, 90, 239
Swope, H.H., 1928a, Harvard Observ. Bull., 857, 1
Swope, H.H., 1928b, Harvard Observ. Bull., 862, 29
Swope, H.H., 1936, Harvard Observ. Annals, 90, 207
Swope, H.H., 1943, Harvard Observ. Annals, 109, 41
Wozniak, P.R., Vestrand, W.T., Akerlof, C.W., et al., 2004, Astron. J., 127, 2436



Main Page | Search
Astronet | SAI | INASAN

Report problems